Experiencing the Body as Play

Josh Andres
Josh Andres
Rakesh Patibanda
Rakesh Patibanda

CHI, 2018.

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Keywords:
game design communitytechnological advancementdigital gameWhole-body interactionexergameMore(11+)
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Interaction design and, in particular, game design has an ongoing interest in the intersection between interactive technology and the human body, fuelled by technological advancements

Abstract:

Games research in HCI is continually interested in the human body. However, recent work suggests that the field has only begun to understand how to design bodily games. We propose that the games research field is advancing from playing with digital content using a keyboard, to using bodies to play with digital content, towards a future wh...More

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Introduction
  • Within HCI’s game design community, there is an ongoing interest in the intersection between interactive technology and the human body.
  • With the aforementioned advancements in technology, the authors believe the game design community has a unique chance to develop digital games and play that not only uses the body as a way to control digital game content, but rather as an opportunity to experience the body as play
  • This builds on the idea that the authors need to consider that humans not only have a body, but are one.
  • The authors see this paper as a starting point towards making this a reality
Highlights
  • Within HCI’s game design community, there is an ongoing interest in the intersection between interactive technology and the human body
  • We present two new perspectives through which designers can examine the human body during gameplay
  • KÖRPER & LEIB AND PLAY So what do the perspectives of Körper and Leib mean for game designers? We argue that before new sensors entered the game design field, we have played computer games using mostly mouse and keyboard, joystick and gamepad; as such we have played with digital game content
  • DESIGN STRATEGIES TO ENGAGE THE KÖRPER-LEIB INTERPLAY IN DIGITAL GAMES AND PLAY In order to provide designers with a better understanding of how they can utilize our theoretical thinking, we describe a set of strategies identified from the games and play systems described above
  • Interaction design and, in particular, game design has an ongoing interest in the intersection between interactive technology and the human body, fuelled by technological advancements
  • Our work aims to contribute to the emerging intersection between the human body and interactive games and play
Methods
  • LEIB INTERPLAY IN DIGITAL GAMES AND PLAY In order to provide designers with a better understanding of how they can utilize the theoretical thinking, the authors describe a set of strategies identified from the games and play systems described above.
  • These strategies aim to highlight the potential of using the Körper-Leib interplay as design resource.
  • By limitations of the Körper the authors mean, for example, that the authors have to rest after sustained intense exercise, the authors cannot hold the breath indefinitely, the authors cannot balance on narrow surfaces without proper training, etc
Conclusion
  • Interaction design and, in particular, game design has an ongoing interest in the intersection between interactive technology and the human body, fuelled by technological advancements.
  • The authors introduced two perspectives on the human body (Körper and Leib) and articulated implications for design.
  • The authors discussed these perspectives by looking at a set of bodily game and play systems from the own and other’s work.
  • The authors hope with the work the authors are aiding in facilitating the many benefits of engaging the human body through games and play, contributing to a more humanized technological future
Summary
  • Introduction:

    Within HCI’s game design community, there is an ongoing interest in the intersection between interactive technology and the human body.
  • With the aforementioned advancements in technology, the authors believe the game design community has a unique chance to develop digital games and play that not only uses the body as a way to control digital game content, but rather as an opportunity to experience the body as play
  • This builds on the idea that the authors need to consider that humans not only have a body, but are one.
  • The authors see this paper as a starting point towards making this a reality
  • Methods:

    LEIB INTERPLAY IN DIGITAL GAMES AND PLAY In order to provide designers with a better understanding of how they can utilize the theoretical thinking, the authors describe a set of strategies identified from the games and play systems described above.
  • These strategies aim to highlight the potential of using the Körper-Leib interplay as design resource.
  • By limitations of the Körper the authors mean, for example, that the authors have to rest after sustained intense exercise, the authors cannot hold the breath indefinitely, the authors cannot balance on narrow surfaces without proper training, etc
  • Conclusion:

    Interaction design and, in particular, game design has an ongoing interest in the intersection between interactive technology and the human body, fuelled by technological advancements.
  • The authors introduced two perspectives on the human body (Körper and Leib) and articulated implications for design.
  • The authors discussed these perspectives by looking at a set of bodily game and play systems from the own and other’s work.
  • The authors hope with the work the authors are aiding in facilitating the many benefits of engaging the human body through games and play, contributing to a more humanized technological future
Related work
  • Prior work has previously demonstrated that when our interactions with technology involve the body to a larger extent than the traditional mouse and keyboard interactions, the result is a significantly different user experience, which can be utilized by game design [42]. To understand and exploit this phenomenon, several theoretical frameworks have emerged in the HCI literature that each offer different perspectives through which the human body can be examined when trying to design for it. For example, Consolvo et al suggested to design for the (unfit) human body through a perspective of behavior change [11]. Similarly, Toscos et al proposed a perspective based around goal setting theory [68] while Yim et al [72] proposed a perspective of motivation. More experiential perspectives have recently complemented these approaches, for example Segura et al suggested a perspective that aims to highlight the “joy of movement” [60]. Mueller et al [49] have introduced a perspective from sports philosophy to advance the field. Furthermore, Loke et al [31] and Wilde et al [70] suggested that a perspective of dance could be beneficial as dancers have a long history of engaging deeply with the human body. These works highlight seeing the human body from more than one perspective can have benefits for design.
Funding
  • Proposes that the games research field is advancing from playing with digital content using a keyboard, to using bodies to play with digital content, towards a future wexperiences our bodies as digital play
  • Presents two phenomenological perspectives on the human body and articulate a suite of design tactics using our own and other people’s work
  • Introduces them to a phenomenological view of the human body that considers the human body both from a material perspective as well as a lived perspective
  • Extends prior philosophical work in this area by articulating what these perspectives can mean for game design
  • Makes a contribution in the form of discussing the German terms “Körper” and “Leib” for the game design community to articulate their implications for design in terms of emotions and feelings as well as stimulations and perceptions. argues that these different perspectives on the human body can be valuable design resources for bodily games
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