Streets for People: Engaging Children in Placemaking Through a Socio-technical Process

CHI, 2018.

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local authority project officersurban areaChildrenreference group membersplacemaking processMore(11+)
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When exploring a scenario about the problems caused by cars on a quiet residential street, several groups from School B questioned the large number of bins blocking the pavement

Abstract:

In this paper, we present a socio-technical process designed to engage children in an ongoing urban design project-Streets for People-in Newcastle, UK. We translated urban design proposals developed by residents and the local authority to enable children to contribute ideas to the project. Our process comprised three stages: situated expl...More

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Introduction
  • There is a long history of local authorities engaging citizens in decisions on how urban areas can be shaped for the benefit of future generations.
  • Whilst the value of local authorities engaging citizens in these decisions is championed [16,56], scholars identify a “democratic deficit” [53] in instrumental placemaking processes affecting children in particular [10,25,28,42]
  • Their exclusion presents several challenges, given that children are just as affected by the places and spaces around them as adults, if not more so [19,49].
  • Such engagement requires citizens to negotiate complex processes, interpret technical drawings and communicate using technocratic language [22,33,66]
Highlights
  • There is a long history of local authorities engaging citizens in decisions on how urban areas can be shaped for the benefit of future generations
  • Working with 54 nine and ten-year-old children in two primary schools, we developed an engagement process that comprised three sessions: (1) a digitally supported neighbourhood walk; (2) issue mapping and peerto-peer discussions using an online engagement platform called Make Place; (3) a ‘Town Hall’ event to open a space for dialogue between the children, residents and the local authority
  • We explore issues arising from involving children in an ongoing, ‘live’ urban design project and draw implications for the design and deployment of socio-technical processes
  • When exploring a scenario about the problems caused by cars on a quiet residential street, several groups from School B questioned the large number of bins blocking the pavement
  • Influencing the Project Notwithstanding this, we found tensions in our data relating to influence and agency of the children taking part, relating to an ambivalence between the extent to which children’s voices were able to influence the project and the extent to which powerful individuals with the reference groups and local authority that could appropriate their voices for instrumental purposes
  • Building on recent work that involved the collaborative development of a toolkit to support community engagement [4], we propose HCI should work towards developing toolkits geared towards facilitating intergenerational dialogue in placemaking processes
Results
  • The authors' findings centre on three main outcomes of the engagement: realising capacities for problem solving and enquiry, opening a space for issue advocacy, and tensions surrounding their influence on the project.
  • Children participating in the neighbourhood walk used the scenarios and activities to make sense of their environment and understand the issues the reference groups were discussing
  • They were able to use these activities as a springboard for further enquiry about other aspects of the streets the authors did not present through the scenarios.
  • When exploring a scenario about the problems caused by cars on a quiet residential street, several groups from School B questioned the large number of bins blocking the pavement
  • In doing so, they identified that this prevented people from walking freely and safely on the pavement.
  • Their enquiry led them to propose several physical and community-based solutions, such as creating bin shelters and talking to residents about the need to clear the pavement
Conclusion
  • The authors draw implications for the design and deployment of socio-technical processes involving children by reflecting on the value and limitations of the engagement and suggesting two ways that future work might account for tensions in supporting children’s participation in civic processes and balancing ethical challenges within this space.

    Engaging Children in Political Processes Through HCI Society often positions children as vulnerable [1].
  • The authors draw implications for the design and deployment of socio-technical processes involving children by reflecting on the value and limitations of the engagement and suggesting two ways that future work might account for tensions in supporting children’s participation in civic processes and balancing ethical challenges within this space.
  • More research is needed to further explore how the authors can design processes that invite collaborations between children, local authorities and citizens in placemaking and that account for the tensions of opening intergenerational participatory spaces
Summary
  • Introduction:

    There is a long history of local authorities engaging citizens in decisions on how urban areas can be shaped for the benefit of future generations.
  • Whilst the value of local authorities engaging citizens in these decisions is championed [16,56], scholars identify a “democratic deficit” [53] in instrumental placemaking processes affecting children in particular [10,25,28,42]
  • Their exclusion presents several challenges, given that children are just as affected by the places and spaces around them as adults, if not more so [19,49].
  • Such engagement requires citizens to negotiate complex processes, interpret technical drawings and communicate using technocratic language [22,33,66]
  • Results:

    The authors' findings centre on three main outcomes of the engagement: realising capacities for problem solving and enquiry, opening a space for issue advocacy, and tensions surrounding their influence on the project.
  • Children participating in the neighbourhood walk used the scenarios and activities to make sense of their environment and understand the issues the reference groups were discussing
  • They were able to use these activities as a springboard for further enquiry about other aspects of the streets the authors did not present through the scenarios.
  • When exploring a scenario about the problems caused by cars on a quiet residential street, several groups from School B questioned the large number of bins blocking the pavement
  • In doing so, they identified that this prevented people from walking freely and safely on the pavement.
  • Their enquiry led them to propose several physical and community-based solutions, such as creating bin shelters and talking to residents about the need to clear the pavement
  • Conclusion:

    The authors draw implications for the design and deployment of socio-technical processes involving children by reflecting on the value and limitations of the engagement and suggesting two ways that future work might account for tensions in supporting children’s participation in civic processes and balancing ethical challenges within this space.

    Engaging Children in Political Processes Through HCI Society often positions children as vulnerable [1].
  • The authors draw implications for the design and deployment of socio-technical processes involving children by reflecting on the value and limitations of the engagement and suggesting two ways that future work might account for tensions in supporting children’s participation in civic processes and balancing ethical challenges within this space.
  • More research is needed to further explore how the authors can design processes that invite collaborations between children, local authorities and citizens in placemaking and that account for the tensions of opening intergenerational participatory spaces
Funding
  • This research was funded through the Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics (EP/L016176/1), Digital Economy Research Centre (EP/M023001/1) and MyPLACE (EP/K037366/1), all EPSRC
  • Data supporting this publication is not openly available due to ethical considerations
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