Protection, Productivity and Pleasure in the Smart Home - Emerging Expectations and Gendered Insights from Australian Early Adopters

Yolande A. A. Strengers
Yolande A. A. Strengers
Jenny Kennedy
Jenny Kennedy
Paula Arcari
Paula Arcari
Melissa Gregg
Melissa Gregg

CHI, pp. 6452019.

Cited by: 0|Bibtex|Views33|Links
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Keywords:
ethnography gender/identity home smart environments/connected home
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We have framed our analysis in the context of emerging gendered usability challenges identified in HCI and social science literature, the need for studies that better understand how householders are incorporating these technologies into their everyday lives and diverse performanc...

Abstract:

Interest and uptake of smart home technologies has been lower than anticipated, particularly among women. Reporting on an academic-industry partnership, we present findings from an ethnographic study with 31 Australian smart home early adopters. The paper analyses these households' experiences in relation to three concepts central to Inte...More

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Introduction
  • As Katuk et al [42] and others have noted, smart home market growth has been slower than expected.
  • Industry commentators have suggested that the smart home industry is “a solution in search of a problem” [22; 32], afflicted by the technological ‘solutionism’ critiqued by Morozov [51]
  • Another key challenge for the smart home industry is that there has tended to be a technical ‘guru’, commonly a man, who brings smart technologies into the home, and is responsible for setting up, maintaining and introducing them to other householders [34; 54; 77].
Highlights
  • As Katuk et al [42] and others have noted, smart home market growth has been slower than expected
  • Industry commentators have suggested that the smart home industry is “a solution in search of a problem” [22; 32], afflicted by the technological ‘solutionism’ critiqued by Morozov [51]
  • Encouraging a broader range of households to adopt and use smart home technologies remains a key concern for the industry
  • What makes the connected home business distinctive from other technology industries arising from PC or media consumption, is a convergence of household security solutions and automation
  • When situated within the domestic violence literature noted above, our findings demonstrate the need to ensure that smart home technologies are accessible and flexible in allowing for different performances of gender and enhanced forms of independence (for women, children and those with disabilities as demonstrated by Angela and Rachel’s case studies (5&7)
  • We have framed our analysis in the context of emerging gendered usability challenges identified in HCI and social science literature, the need for studies that better understand how householders are incorporating these technologies into their everyday lives and diverse performances of gender
Methods
  • Digital ethnography is a research methodology that provides in-depth insights into how people experience the digital in their everyday lives.
  • It typically involves in situ research with participants, through observations, conversations and reflections.
  • It involves digital methods to explore and gather insights in collaboration with participants [52; 57].
  • Intel’s 3Ps vision has been informed by extensive ethnographic research, and feedback from multiple industry stakeholders, including the authors’ gender studies scholarship and smart home research, conducted independently and together [30; 31; 43; 53; 54; 73,74,75]
Results
  • The authors identify how Australian households in this study understood and experienced the 3Ps. For each ‘P’ the authors provide a summary of the key themes and gendered dynamics that emerged from the analysis.
  • The authors provide four case studies for each P selected from the household dataset as Supplementary Material.
  • While each case study emphasizes a single households’ perspective on one P, there is considerable overlap and discussion between the 3Ps amongst these households which the authors draw out below.
  • Case study photographs were taken by the research team at the participating households’ homes.
Conclusion
  • In this paper the authors have analyzed the smart home through Intel’s ambient computing vision of the ‘3Ps’ in relation to the ethnographic research with early-adopting smart home households.
  • The authors have demonstrated how men and women can take up different roles and responsibilities in the smart home, and in some cases desire different variations of productivity, protection and pleasure.
  • In this regard, the participants’ interactions with the smart home afford them opportunities to express, and experiment with, multiple and emerging versions of masculinity and femininity
Summary
  • Introduction:

    As Katuk et al [42] and others have noted, smart home market growth has been slower than expected.
  • Industry commentators have suggested that the smart home industry is “a solution in search of a problem” [22; 32], afflicted by the technological ‘solutionism’ critiqued by Morozov [51]
  • Another key challenge for the smart home industry is that there has tended to be a technical ‘guru’, commonly a man, who brings smart technologies into the home, and is responsible for setting up, maintaining and introducing them to other householders [34; 54; 77].
  • Methods:

    Digital ethnography is a research methodology that provides in-depth insights into how people experience the digital in their everyday lives.
  • It typically involves in situ research with participants, through observations, conversations and reflections.
  • It involves digital methods to explore and gather insights in collaboration with participants [52; 57].
  • Intel’s 3Ps vision has been informed by extensive ethnographic research, and feedback from multiple industry stakeholders, including the authors’ gender studies scholarship and smart home research, conducted independently and together [30; 31; 43; 53; 54; 73,74,75]
  • Results:

    The authors identify how Australian households in this study understood and experienced the 3Ps. For each ‘P’ the authors provide a summary of the key themes and gendered dynamics that emerged from the analysis.
  • The authors provide four case studies for each P selected from the household dataset as Supplementary Material.
  • While each case study emphasizes a single households’ perspective on one P, there is considerable overlap and discussion between the 3Ps amongst these households which the authors draw out below.
  • Case study photographs were taken by the research team at the participating households’ homes.
  • Conclusion:

    In this paper the authors have analyzed the smart home through Intel’s ambient computing vision of the ‘3Ps’ in relation to the ethnographic research with early-adopting smart home households.
  • The authors have demonstrated how men and women can take up different roles and responsibilities in the smart home, and in some cases desire different variations of productivity, protection and pleasure.
  • In this regard, the participants’ interactions with the smart home afford them opportunities to express, and experiment with, multiple and emerging versions of masculinity and femininity
Tables
  • Table1: Table 1
  • Table2: Case studies of the 3Ps
  • Table3: Summary of design challenges and opportunities
Download tables as Excel
Related work
  • Defining the Smart Home

    How a home is understood and portrayed as being ‘smart’ varies between two perspectives. At one hand, a smart home is “a home that is equipped with technology to remotely control household systems like lighting, temperature, security alarms, surveillance cameras and other connected appliances” [40, p.1]. On the other hand, definitions such as that put forward by Balta-Ozkan et al [2, p.364], emphasize that the smart home also “provide[s] services that respond to the needs of its inhabitants”. Similarly, Darby [20, p.140] notes two broad categories, one being “building- and system-focused” and the other “homeand user-focused”. Mennicken et al [49, p.1] make a related distinction between remote access technologies with no automation, and those that are “responsive to their inhabitants and adapt autonomously in sophisticated ways”. Technologies that reflect the former approach have been critiqued by Eggen et al for their “failure to study the social context in which technology will be used and its implications on daily life” [25, p.44], while the latter better reflects the HCI field [65].
Funding
  • This research was supported under the Australian Research Council's Discovery Early Career Researchers Award funding scheme (project number DE150100278), and through a generous gift from Intel Corporation
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