Investigating Slowness as a Frame to Design Longer-Term Experiences with Personal Data - A Field Study of Olly

Jeroen Hol
Jeroen Hol
Bram Naus
Bram Naus
Pepijn Verburg
Pepijn Verburg
Tal Amram
Tal Amram
Amy Yo Sue Chen
Amy Yo Sue Chen

CHI, pp. 342019.

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Keywords:
digital music home personal data research through design slow technologyMore(1+)
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Our work contributes a rare account of how slowness can operate as a frame for creating design artifacts that can sustain valued, longer-term experiences with archives of personal data in everyday life

Abstract:

We describe the design and deployment of Olly, a domestic music player that enables people to re-experience digital music they listened to in the past. Olly uses its owner's Last.FM listening history metadata archive to occasionally select a song from their past, but offers no user control over what is selected or when. We deployed Olly i...More

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Introduction
  • People’s practices of acquiring and consuming music have and continue to play key roles in supporting experiences of self-reflection [10, 27] and social interaction [6, 55, 66, 76].
  • As a byproduct of the widespread uptake of digital music listening applications and services, vast archives of personal music listening history metadata are generated that log exactly what music people listened to and when.
  • These shifts pose new issues for HCI.
Highlights
  • People’s practices of acquiring and consuming music have and continue to play key roles in supporting experiences of self-reflection [10, 27] and social interaction [6, 55, 66, 76]
  • We report on Olly’s role in mediating experiences between participants and their digital music archives; and, describe participants’ reactions to living with a slow technology
  • Our work highlights the need for future research to explore how new technologies could be designed that embrace unfamiliar constraints, operate independently, emphasize pre- or postinteraction experiences, in addition to moments of direct engagement
  • Designing for slowness and longer-term human-technology relations represents an important area for future research in the HCI community
  • Our work contributes a rare account of how slowness can operate as a frame for creating design artifacts that can sustain valued, longer-term experiences with archives of personal data in everyday life
  • We believe that new possibilities for change can emerge through a design-led approach that combines the crafting of highly resolved design artifacts that offer a concrete ‘feel’ of future possibilities, with longer-term narratives of human experiences of them
Methods
  • The authors have described and critically reflected on the process of designing Olly in detail with attention to decisions and alternatives explored across it [51][55].
  • To support the goal of understanding people’s longer-term experiences with a slow technology, this design process was highly influenced by the concept of research products [52] – artifacts designed to drive a research inquiry and that have a high quality of finish such that people engage with them as is, rather than what they might become
  • Another requirement of research products is that they are able to operate independently for long periods of time in everyday environments.
  • The final version of Olly is highly resolved and designed to exacting requirements
Results
  • Participants exhibited changing attitudes characterized by initial delight, a brief period of tension, and a shift to acceptance.
  • Gaver et al [17] describe people’s cumulative experiences of new technologies during field deployment studies as moving across a trajectory of appreciation.
  • People’s experiences with it might improve as they develop ways to work around tensions and integrate it into their lives.
  • All three exhibited a reasonably similar trajectory: initial excitement, followed by a brief period of tension, and, acceptance
Conclusion
  • DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS

    It is clear that music holds a significant place in people’s lives.
  • The authors designed Olly to critically investigate how its slow pace and temporal expressiveness could sustain longer-term experiences with participants’ respective personal music listening history archives.
  • The authors' work contributes a rare account of how slowness can operate as a frame for creating design artifacts that can sustain valued, longer-term experiences with archives of personal data in everyday life.
  • As new forms of technology mediate the everyday experiences, there is a critical need in the HCI community to delve deeply into seemingly mundane activities to ask how the normative assumptions of design, technology use, and human experience are adequate, adaptive, and what the authors want
Summary
  • Introduction:

    People’s practices of acquiring and consuming music have and continue to play key roles in supporting experiences of self-reflection [10, 27] and social interaction [6, 55, 66, 76].
  • As a byproduct of the widespread uptake of digital music listening applications and services, vast archives of personal music listening history metadata are generated that log exactly what music people listened to and when.
  • These shifts pose new issues for HCI.
  • Methods:

    The authors have described and critically reflected on the process of designing Olly in detail with attention to decisions and alternatives explored across it [51][55].
  • To support the goal of understanding people’s longer-term experiences with a slow technology, this design process was highly influenced by the concept of research products [52] – artifacts designed to drive a research inquiry and that have a high quality of finish such that people engage with them as is, rather than what they might become
  • Another requirement of research products is that they are able to operate independently for long periods of time in everyday environments.
  • The final version of Olly is highly resolved and designed to exacting requirements
  • Results:

    Participants exhibited changing attitudes characterized by initial delight, a brief period of tension, and a shift to acceptance.
  • Gaver et al [17] describe people’s cumulative experiences of new technologies during field deployment studies as moving across a trajectory of appreciation.
  • People’s experiences with it might improve as they develop ways to work around tensions and integrate it into their lives.
  • All three exhibited a reasonably similar trajectory: initial excitement, followed by a brief period of tension, and, acceptance
  • Conclusion:

    DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS

    It is clear that music holds a significant place in people’s lives.
  • The authors designed Olly to critically investigate how its slow pace and temporal expressiveness could sustain longer-term experiences with participants’ respective personal music listening history archives.
  • The authors' work contributes a rare account of how slowness can operate as a frame for creating design artifacts that can sustain valued, longer-term experiences with archives of personal data in everyday life.
  • As new forms of technology mediate the everyday experiences, there is a critical need in the HCI community to delve deeply into seemingly mundane activities to ask how the normative assumptions of design, technology use, and human experience are adequate, adaptive, and what the authors want
Funding
  • This research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)
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