Project Jacquard: Interactive Digital Textiles at Scale

Shiho Fukuhara
Shiho Fukuhara
Karen E. Robinson
Karen E. Robinson

CHI, pp. 4216-4227, 2016.

Cited by: 164|Bibtex|Views153|Links
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Keywords:
textile manufacturingultimate tensile strengthInternet of Thingscapacitive touchdigital textilesMore(11+)
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Further studies and gesture interaction design are needed to accommodate this new form of wearable input that project Jacquard presents

Abstract:

Project Jacquard presents manufacturing technologies that enable deploying invisible ubiquitous interactivity at scale. We propose novel interactive textile materials that can be manufactured inexpensively using existing textile weaving technology and equipment. The development of touch-sensitive textiles begins with the design and engin...More

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Introduction
  • AND RELATED WORK Textiles are one of the most fundamental and universal ingredients used to build the world around us.
  • Conductive yarns have a number of industrial applications including construction of antistatic and heat-resistant textiles as well ornamental uses.
  • They have been broadly used in designing interactive textiles and garments, primarily via embroidery and usually have one of the following structures (Figure 2): Multifilament core yarns with metal coating (Figure 2a).
  • These yarns often have inconsistent resistivity along the yarn’s length, which changes with wear and tear; they cannot be soldered
Highlights
  • AND RELATED WORK Textiles are one of the most fundamental and universal ingredients used to build the world around us
  • We describe the development of yarn, textiles, garments, and user interactivity; we present the opportunities and challenges of creating a manufacturable interactive textile for wearable computing
  • This paper presents Project Jacquard, which contributes to and extends the previous body of work by proposing novel interactive textile materials that can be manufactured inexpensively and at scale with standard textile weaving technology and equipment
  • They have been broadly used in designing interactive textiles and garments, primarily via embroidery and usually have one of the following structures (Figure 2): Multifilament core yarns with metal coating (Figure 2a)
  • We presented Project Jacquard that allows weaving interactive textiles at scale
  • Further studies and gesture interaction design are needed to accommodate this new form of wearable input that project Jacquard presents
Methods
  • 3D Woven Textile Structures In the first design of Jacquard textiles the interactive grid was woven throughout the entire cloth as shown in Figure 9a.
  • The authors used red conductive yarns to visualize the conduc tive grid.
  • This textile design proved highly impractical in trying to design applications of Jacquard interactive textiles.
  • In addition it was important for them to preserve the original vision of inter active textiles where interactivity is seamlessly woven into the fabric, rather than an external add-on
Results
  • When the authors break down the recognition rate across the conditions the authors achieve 74.6%, 80.6% and 75.3% for sitting standing and walking respectively.
  • The authors observe that recognition rate changes significantly depending on the activity that the user engages into, which is to be expected and warrant further explo ration in interaction design.
  • Additional paired t-tests show that the swipe right gesture has the greatest difference in sit versus stand activity (p=0.001)
Conclusion
  • The authors presented Project Jacquard that allows weaving interactive textiles at scale.
  • The authors hope that the current work will inspire research in new forms of materials and integration of computation into the everyday objects and environ ments, bringing the vision of invisible seamless computing one step closer to the reality.
  • The authors leant that effectiveness of wearable gesture sensors strongly correlated to the context of human activity.
  • Further studies and gesture interaction design are needed to accommodate this new form of wearable input that project Jacquard presents
Summary
  • Introduction:

    AND RELATED WORK Textiles are one of the most fundamental and universal ingredients used to build the world around us.
  • Conductive yarns have a number of industrial applications including construction of antistatic and heat-resistant textiles as well ornamental uses.
  • They have been broadly used in designing interactive textiles and garments, primarily via embroidery and usually have one of the following structures (Figure 2): Multifilament core yarns with metal coating (Figure 2a).
  • These yarns often have inconsistent resistivity along the yarn’s length, which changes with wear and tear; they cannot be soldered
  • Methods:

    3D Woven Textile Structures In the first design of Jacquard textiles the interactive grid was woven throughout the entire cloth as shown in Figure 9a.
  • The authors used red conductive yarns to visualize the conduc tive grid.
  • This textile design proved highly impractical in trying to design applications of Jacquard interactive textiles.
  • In addition it was important for them to preserve the original vision of inter active textiles where interactivity is seamlessly woven into the fabric, rather than an external add-on
  • Results:

    When the authors break down the recognition rate across the conditions the authors achieve 74.6%, 80.6% and 75.3% for sitting standing and walking respectively.
  • The authors observe that recognition rate changes significantly depending on the activity that the user engages into, which is to be expected and warrant further explo ration in interaction design.
  • Additional paired t-tests show that the swipe right gesture has the greatest difference in sit versus stand activity (p=0.001)
  • Conclusion:

    The authors presented Project Jacquard that allows weaving interactive textiles at scale.
  • The authors hope that the current work will inspire research in new forms of materials and integration of computation into the everyday objects and environ ments, bringing the vision of invisible seamless computing one step closer to the reality.
  • The authors leant that effectiveness of wearable gesture sensors strongly correlated to the context of human activity.
  • Further studies and gesture interaction design are needed to accommodate this new form of wearable input that project Jacquard presents
Tables
  • Table1: Physical properties of 50 micrometers copper wire are comparable to cotton, silk and wool yarns which ensures natural look and feel of the Jacquard yarns
Download tables as Excel
Funding
  • Proposes novel interactive textile materials that can be manufactured inexpensively using existing textile weaving technology and equipment
  • Describes the development of yarn, textiles, garments, and user interactivity; presents the opportunities and challenges of creating a manufacturable interactive textile for wearable computing
  • Presents Project Jacquard, which contributes to and extends the previous body of work by proposing novel interactive textile materials that can be manufactured inexpensively and at scale with standard textile weaving technology and equipment
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