RapID: A Framework for Fabricating Low-Latency Interactive Objects with RFID Tags

CHI, pp. 5897-5908, 2016.

Cited by: 31|Bibtex|Views63|Links
EI
Keywords:
interactive objectlow latencycomputational fabricationElectronic Product Codeprobabilistic modelingMore(4+)
Weibo:
This, coupled with an API for managing probabilistic interactions and a simple design interface embedded in SketchUp makes RapID both an easy to use and flexible design and development platform. By making it easy to add Radio Frequency Identification-based sensing to objects, Rap...

Abstract:

RFID tags can be used to add inexpensive, wireless, batteryless sensing to objects. However, quickly and accurately estimating the state of an RFID tag is difficult. In this work, we show how to achieve low-latency manipulation and movement sensing with off-the-shelf RFID tags and readers. Our approach couples a probabilistic filtering la...More

Code:

Data:

0
Introduction
  • Graphical user interfaces can be constructed very quickly by composing them from a component library and writing a small amount of “glue” code to carry out user actions.
  • By accurately modeling the probabilities of partially understood input, it is possible to make less conservative, but more informed decisions, and to deliver them faster – with typical delays under 200 msec
  • This means that input can generally be reported with a latency at, or under, typical minimum human perception-action cycle times [3] – more in line with most interactive systems than the two second delay that characterized previous work [16].
  • While these frameworks automate much of the low-level design work, fabricating circuits is still a manual process which does not exploit digital manufacturing tools or the quick peel-and-stick advantages of RFID tags
Highlights
  • Currently, graphical user interfaces can be constructed very quickly by composing them from a component library and writing a small amount of “glue” code to carry out user actions
  • Recent advances in the analysis of the underlying Radio Frequency Identification signals used for identifying tags have demonstrated that manipulations of tags, such as human touch, cover by conductive or dielectric materials, and tag motion, can be reliably detected using standard Radio Frequency Identification tags and conventional readers positioned up to several meters away [16]
  • We introduce a new probabilistic framework for processing Radio Frequency Identification tag signals which allows the application to respond to input much more quickly
  • The probabilistic formulation used to process the Radio Frequency Identification tag signals can smoothly incorporate state information from an application, and probabilistic estimates can optionally be exposed to the application so that it can reason about them in an informed fashion
  • STANDARD COMPONENT LIBRARY While Radio Frequency Identification tags can be embedded on any object, we provide an interface for designing new objects from scratch
  • This, coupled with an API for managing probabilistic interactions and a simple design interface embedded in SketchUp makes RapID both an easy to use and flexible design and development platform. By making it easy to add Radio Frequency Identification-based sensing to objects, RapID enables the design of new, custom interactive objects with a very fast development cycle
Conclusion
  • Off-the-shelf RFID tags and readers can support reasonably low-latency wireless interactivity.
  • Because only a limited number number of tag reads happens within a single channel, and two reads of the same tag must happen within the same channel in order to extract motion features, with enough tags tracking quick motion accurately becomes infeasible
  • This wasn’t an issue in any of the demonstrations, but with enough tags the authors expect it to become one.The authors demonstrated how a designer can use RFID tags to add inexpensive, wireless, low-footprint, batteryless, low-latency input sensing to objects.
  • By making it easy to add RFID-based sensing to objects, RapID enables the design of new, custom interactive objects with a very fast development cycle
Summary
  • Introduction:

    Graphical user interfaces can be constructed very quickly by composing them from a component library and writing a small amount of “glue” code to carry out user actions.
  • By accurately modeling the probabilities of partially understood input, it is possible to make less conservative, but more informed decisions, and to deliver them faster – with typical delays under 200 msec
  • This means that input can generally be reported with a latency at, or under, typical minimum human perception-action cycle times [3] – more in line with most interactive systems than the two second delay that characterized previous work [16].
  • While these frameworks automate much of the low-level design work, fabricating circuits is still a manual process which does not exploit digital manufacturing tools or the quick peel-and-stick advantages of RFID tags
  • Conclusion:

    Off-the-shelf RFID tags and readers can support reasonably low-latency wireless interactivity.
  • Because only a limited number number of tag reads happens within a single channel, and two reads of the same tag must happen within the same channel in order to extract motion features, with enough tags tracking quick motion accurately becomes infeasible
  • This wasn’t an issue in any of the demonstrations, but with enough tags the authors expect it to become one.The authors demonstrated how a designer can use RFID tags to add inexpensive, wireless, low-footprint, batteryless, low-latency input sensing to objects.
  • By making it easy to add RFID-based sensing to objects, RapID enables the design of new, custom interactive objects with a very fast development cycle
Funding
  • Shows how to achieve low-latency manipulation and movement sensing with off-the-shelf RFID tags and readers
  • Demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach with a number of interactive objects, along with a library of components that can be combined to make new designs
  • Introduces a new probabilistic framework for processing RFID tag signals which allows the application to respond to input much more quickly
  • Has built an extension to the SketchUp 3D drawing package which allows a library of interactive components built using our techniques to be integrated with physical objects The library provides is implemented entirely with small, inexpensive UHF RFID tags
  • Provides a system overview of RapID, our framework for RFIDbased interaction
Reference
  • Xiaojun Bi and Shumin Zhai. 2013. Bayesian touch: a statistical criterion of target selection with finger touch. In The 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST’13, St. Andrews, United Kingdom, October 8-11, 2013. 51–60. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2501988.2502058
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Michael Buettner, Richa Prasad, Matthai Philipose, and David Wetherall. 2009. Recognizing daily activities with RFID-based sensors. In UbiComp 2009: Ubiquitous Computing, 11th International Conference, UbiComp 2009, Orlando, Florida, USA, September 30 - October 3, 2009, Proceedings. 51–60. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1620545.1620553
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Stuart K Card, Allen Newell, and Thomas P Moran. 1983. The psychology of human-computer interaction. L. Erlbaum Associates Inc.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Federal Communication Commission (FCC). 2011. Title 47: Telecommunication, Part 15 Radio Frequency Devices. www.fcc.gov. (January, 31 2011). http://www.fcc.gov/
    Findings
  • Kenneth P. Fishkin, Bing Jiang, Matthai Philipose, and Sumit Roy. 2004. I Sense a Disturbance in the Force: Unobtrusive Detection of Interactions with RFID-tagged Objects. In UbiComp 2004: Ubiquitous Computing: 6th International Conference, Nottingham, UK, September 7-10, 2004. Proceedings. 268–282. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-30119-6_16
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Saul Greenberg and Chester Fitchett. 2001. Phidgets: easy development of physical interfaces through physical widgets. In Proceedings of the 14th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2001, Disney’s BoardWalk Inn Resort, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA, November 11-14, 2001. 209–218. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/502348.502388
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Tobias Alexander Große-Puppendahl, Yannick Berghoefer, Andreas Braun, Raphael Wimmer, and Arjan Kuijper. 2013. OpenCapSense: A rapid prototyping toolkit for pervasive interaction using capacitive sensing. In 2013 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications, PerCom 2013, San Diego, CA, USA, March 18-22, 2013. 152–159. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/PerCom.2013.6526726
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • GS1. 2004. EPC Radio-Frequency Identity Protocols Generation-2 UHF RFID. (2004). http://www.gs1.org/sites/default/files/docs/epc/Gen2_Protocol_Standard.pdf.
    Findings
  • Björn Hartmann, Scott R. Klemmer, Michael S. Bernstein, Leith Abdulla, Brandon Burr, Avi Robinson-Mosher, and Jennifer Gee. 2006. Reflective physical prototyping through integrated design, test, and analysis. In Proceedings of the 19th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, Montreux, Switzerland, October 15-18, 2006. 299–308. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1166253.1166300
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Scott E. Hudson and Jennifer Mankoff. 2006. Rapid construction of functioning physical interfaces from cardboard, thumbtacks, tin foil and masking tape. In Proceedings of the 19th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, Montreux, Switzerland, October 15-18, 2006. 289–298. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1166253.1166299
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Scott E. Hudson and Gary L. Newell. 1992. Probabilistic State Machines: Dialog Management for Inputs with Uncertainty. In Proceedings of the Fifth ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 1992, Monteray, CA, USA, November 15-18, 1992. 199–208. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/142621.142650
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Impinj. 2013. Low Level User Data Support. Application Note. (2013). https://support.impinj.com/hc/en-us/articles/
    Findings
  • Impinj, Inc. 2011. Impinj Speedway Revolution R220 (www.impinj.com ed.). Impinj, Inc., 701 N. 34th Street, Suite 300 Seattle, WA 98103.
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Gierad Laput, Eric Brockmeyer, Scott E. Hudson, and Chris Harrison. 2015. Acoustruments: Passive, Acoustically-Driven, Interactive Controls for Handheld Devices. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015, Seoul, Republic of Korea, April 18-23, 2015. 2161–2170. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702414
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Johnny C. Lee, Daniel Avrahami, Scott E. Hudson, Jodi Forlizzi, Paul H. Dietz, and Darren Leigh. 2004. The calder toolkit: wired and wireless components for rapidly prototyping interactive devices. In Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, Cambridge, MA, USA, August 1-4, 2004. 167–175. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1013115.1013139
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Hanchuan Li, Can Ye, and Alanson P. Sample. 2015. IDSense: A Human Object Interaction Detection System Based on Passive UHF RFID. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015, Seoul, Republic of Korea, April 18-23, 2015. 2555–2564. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702178
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • RFID Journal LLC. 2015. How much does an RFID tag cost today? (sep 2015). http://www.rfidjournal.com/faq/show?85
    Findings
  • Trimble Navigation Ltd. 2000–2015. Sketchup. http://www.sketchup.com/. (2000–2015).
    Findings
  • Jennifer Mankoff, Scott E. Hudson, and Gregory D. Abowd. 2000a. Interaction techniques for ambiguity resolution in recognition-based interfaces. In Proceedings of the 13th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2000, San Diego, California, USA, November 6-8, 2000. 11–20. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/354401.354407
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Jennifer Mankoff, Scott E. Hudson, and Gregory D. Abowd. 2000b. Providing integrated toolkit-level support for ambiguity in recognition-based interfaces. In Proceedings of the CHI 2000 Conference on Human factors in computing systems, The Hague, The Netherlands, April 1-6, 2000. 368–375. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/332040.332459
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • David Mellis, Sam Jacoby, Leah Buechley, Hannah Perner-Wilson, and Jie Qi. 2013. Microcontrollers as material: crafting circuits with paper, conductive ink, electronic components, and an "untoolkit". In Seventh International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, TEI’13, Barcelona, Spain, February 10-13, 2013. 83–90. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2460625.2460638
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • P.V. Nikitin, R. Martinez, S. Ramamurthy, H. Leland, G. Spiess, and K.V.S. Rao. 2010. Phase based spatial identification of UHF RFID tags. In 2010 IEEE International Conference on RFID. 102–109. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/RFID.2010.5467253
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Sharon L. Oviatt. 1999. Mutual Disambiguation of Recognition Errors in a Multimodel Architecture. In Proceeding of the CHI ’99 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: The CHI is the Limit, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, May 15-20, 1999. 576–583. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/302979.303163
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Siddika Parlak and Ivan Marsic. 2013. Detecting object motion using passive RFID: A trauma resuscitation case study. Instrumentation and Measurement, IEEE Transactions on 62, 9 (2013), 2430–2437.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Matthai Philipose. 2005. Large-Scale human activity recognition using ultra-dense sensing. The Bridge, National Academy of Engineering 35, 4 (2005).
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Raf Ramakers, Kashyap Todi, and Kris Luyten. 2015. PaperPulse: An Integrated Approach for Embedding Electronics in Paper Designs. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015, Seoul, Republic of Korea, April 18-23, 2015. 2457–2466. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702487
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Valkyrie Savage, Colin Chang, and Björn Hartmann. 2013. Sauron: embedded single-camera sensing of printed physical user interfaces. In The 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST’13, St. Andrews, United Kingdom, October 8-11, 2013. 447–456. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2501988.2501992
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Valkyrie Savage, Andrew Head, Björn Hartmann, Dan B. Goldman, Gautham J. Mysore, and Wilmot Li. 2015. Lamello: Passive Acoustic Sensing for Tangible Input Components. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015, Seoul, Republic of Korea, April 18-23, 2015. 1277–1280. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702207
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Valkyrie Savage, Xiaohan Zhang, and Björn Hartmann. 2012. Midas: fabricating custom capacitive touch sensors to prototype interactive objects. In The 25th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST ’12, Cambridge, MA, USA, October 7-10, 2012. 579–588. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2380116.2380189
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Julia Schwarz, Jennifer Mankoff, and Scott E. Hudson. 2011. Monte carlo methods for managing interactive state, action and feedback under uncertainty. In Proceedings of the 24th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, Santa Barbara, CA, USA, October 16-19, 2011. 235–244. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2047196.2047227
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Julia Schwarz, Jennifer Mankoff, and Scott E. Hudson. 2015. An Architecture for Generating Interactive Feedback in Probabilistic User Interfaces. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015, Seoul, Republic of Korea, April 18-23, 2015. 2545–2554. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702228
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • ThingMagic, A Division of Trimble 2015. M6E-NANO: Embedded UHF RFID Module (www.thingmagic.com ed.). ThingMagic, A Division of Trimble, One Merrill Street Woburn, MA 01801.
    Findings
  • Sebastian Thrun, Wolfram Burgard, and Dieter Fox. 2005. Probabilistic Robotics (Intelligent Robotics and Autonomous Agents). The MIT Press.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Alexander Wiethoff, Hanna Schneider, Julia Küfner, Michael Rohs, Andreas Butz, and Saul Greenberg. 2013. Paperbox: a toolkit for exploring tangible interaction on interactive surfaces. In Creativity and Cognition 2013, C&C ’13, Sydney, NSW, Australia, June 17-20, 2013. 64–73. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466627.2466635
    Findings
  • John Williamson. 2006. Continuous uncertain interaction. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Glasgow.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Robert Xiao, Chris Harrison, and Scott E. Hudson. 2013. WorldKit: rapid and easy creation of ad-hoc interactive applications on everyday surfaces. In 2013 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI ’13, Paris, France, April 27 - May 2, 2013. 879–888. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2470654.2466113
    Locate open access versionFindings
Your rating :
0

 

Best Paper
Best Paper of CHI, 2016
Tags
Comments