FlexCase: Enhancing Mobile Interaction with a Flexible Sensing and Display Cover

CHI, pp. 5138-5150, 2016.

Cited by: 23|Bibtex|Views88|Links
EI
Keywords:
flip coverinteraction techniqueFlexibledifferent configurationoutputMore(17+)
Weibo:
We provided insights about the design process for the form factor as well as the interaction techniques and systematically explored the design space, resulting from the different configurations and modalities

Abstract:

FlexCase is a novel flip cover for smartphones, which brings flexible input and output capabilities to existing mobile phones. It combines an e-paper display with a pressure- and bend-sensitive input sensor to augment the capabilities of a phone. Due to the form factor, FlexCase can be easily transformed into several different configurati...More

Code:

Data:

0
Introduction
  • The smartphone has revolutionized computing, making interacting with digital information as simple as reaching into your pocket.
  • Researchers have looked at using flexible sensors [41] or even the combination of flexible display and input [15, 19, 22, 27, 28, 47, 48] to bring more paper-like physical interactions to mobile devices
  • Another trend extends the output space of smartphones by using electronic paper (e-paper) displays in conjunction with the phone’s regular screen [5, 35, 38, 55].
  • Speed can be controlled by varying the amount of bending
Highlights
  • The smartphone has revolutionized computing, making interacting with digital information as simple as reaching into your pocket
  • Paperfold shows multi-display interaction for e-paper based mobile devices, our work explores the use of novel flexible input and output combined with a regular phone
  • WORK In this paper, we presented a novel flip cover concept for smartphones, which combines a purpose-built touch, pressure and flex sensor with an e-paper display
  • Users can use our system to perform a variety of touch, pressure, grip and bend gestures in a natural manner, much like interacting with a sheet of paper, without occluding the main screen
  • The secondary e-paper display can act as a mechanism for providing user feedback and persisting content from the main display
  • We provided insights about the design process for the form factor as well as the interaction techniques and systematically explored the design space, resulting from the different configurations and modalities
Methods
  • The authors' work overlaps with many areas of interaction research, and this is because of the richness, flexibility, and diverse capabilities that the flip cover configuration affords.
  • The authors' work preserves the interactive qualities of existing smartphones and augments their capabilities with additional input and output, in the form of a highly interactive, bendable flip cover.
  • The authors explore the different physical configurations and interactive modalities the flip cover form factor affords.
  • The secondary display can be used for displaying persistent information without battery drain but can act as a high-fidelity input device for continuous interaction
Results
  • For the Book set of grips, the linear method achieved 70% accuracy on the test set, while the non-linear feature mapping approach reached 92.5% accuracy on the same test set.
Conclusion
  • DISCUSSION & LIMITATIONS

    In this paper, the authors have focused on a new mobile interaction concept called FlexCase.
  • The authors gained promising feedback from informal evaluation sessions with FlexCase, a quantitative comparison is clearly needed in the future, but was out of scope for this paper, where the authors focus on the interactive capabilities of the system.
  • The authors have demonstrated many interactive and application capabilities, and highlighted how touch and flex sensing can be combined in a novel way, e.g. the Grip & Bend technique.
  • The range of applications already shown suggests a rich design space for researchers and practitioners to explore in the future
Summary
  • Introduction:

    The smartphone has revolutionized computing, making interacting with digital information as simple as reaching into your pocket.
  • Researchers have looked at using flexible sensors [41] or even the combination of flexible display and input [15, 19, 22, 27, 28, 47, 48] to bring more paper-like physical interactions to mobile devices
  • Another trend extends the output space of smartphones by using electronic paper (e-paper) displays in conjunction with the phone’s regular screen [5, 35, 38, 55].
  • Speed can be controlled by varying the amount of bending
  • Objectives:

    The goal of the study was not to find the most natural grips without any constraints, but a distinctive set of common grips, which can be used to train and test the learning-based algorithm.
  • Methods:

    The authors' work overlaps with many areas of interaction research, and this is because of the richness, flexibility, and diverse capabilities that the flip cover configuration affords.
  • The authors' work preserves the interactive qualities of existing smartphones and augments their capabilities with additional input and output, in the form of a highly interactive, bendable flip cover.
  • The authors explore the different physical configurations and interactive modalities the flip cover form factor affords.
  • The secondary display can be used for displaying persistent information without battery drain but can act as a high-fidelity input device for continuous interaction
  • Results:

    For the Book set of grips, the linear method achieved 70% accuracy on the test set, while the non-linear feature mapping approach reached 92.5% accuracy on the same test set.
  • Conclusion:

    DISCUSSION & LIMITATIONS

    In this paper, the authors have focused on a new mobile interaction concept called FlexCase.
  • The authors gained promising feedback from informal evaluation sessions with FlexCase, a quantitative comparison is clearly needed in the future, but was out of scope for this paper, where the authors focus on the interactive capabilities of the system.
  • The authors have demonstrated many interactive and application capabilities, and highlighted how touch and flex sensing can be combined in a novel way, e.g. the Grip & Bend technique.
  • The range of applications already shown suggests a rich design space for researchers and practitioners to explore in the future
Tables
  • Table1: Designers should bare in mind that not every combination of configurations and modalities is compatible and useful
Download tables as Excel
Related work
  • Our work relates to many areas of HCI research, including work on flexible displays and mobile interaction. In this section, we will introduce the most important work for each field, starting with a review of devices combining traditional touchscreens and e-paper displays. Then we discuss work dealing with flexible display interaction and interactions with multiple displays. Finally, we discuss possibilities of extending input around and behind the device.

    Combination of Touchscreen & E-Paper Display Nook [5] was one of the first commercial E-Readers, which combined an electronic paper display with an additional smaller LCD touchscreen. The secondary display was mainly used for more dynamic interactions such as animated menus. More recent products, like Yotaphone [55], InkCase [35], or PopSlate [38], use e-paper displays as a secondary, more power-efficient ambient display. Although these products show compelling scenarios, the secondary display is not used as an additional input device nor as direct extension of the main display, thus both screens are mostly used in isolation. In contrast, Dementyev et al [14] showed wirelessly powered display tags, which can serve as mobile phone companion displays. However, they were not attached to a smartphone.
Funding
  • The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union, Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement No 611104
Reference
  • Teemu T. Ahmaniemi, Johan Kildal, and Merja Haveri. 2014. What is a Device Bend Gesture Really Good for?. In Proceedings of the 32Nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 3503–3512. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2556288.2557306
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Rufino Ansara and Audrey Girouard. 2014. Augmenting Bend Gestures with Pressure Zones on Flexible Displays. In Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Human-computer Interaction with Mobile Devices & Services (MobileHCI ’14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 531–536. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2628363.2634228
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Ravin Balakrishnan, George Fitzmaurice, Gordon Kurtenbach, and Karan Singh. 1999. Exploring Interactive Curve and Surface Manipulation Using a Bend and Twist Sensitive Input Strip. In Proceedings of the 1999 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics (I3D ’99). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 111–118. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/300523.300536
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Ravin Balakrishnan and Ken Hinckley. 1999. The Role of Kinesthetic Reference Frames in Two-handed Input Performance. In Proceedings of the 12th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’99). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 171–178. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/320719.322599
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Barnes and Noble International LLC. 2015. http://www.nook.com. (2015).
    Findings
  • Patrick Baudisch and Gerry Chu. 2009. Back-of-device Interaction Allows Creating Very Small Touch Devices. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’09). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1923–1932. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1518701.1518995
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Christopher M. Bishop. 2006. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning (Information Science and Statistics). Springer-Verlag New York, Inc.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Jesse Burstyn, Amartya Banerjee, and Roel Vertegaal. 2013. FlexView: An Evaluation of Depth Navigation on Deformable Mobile Devices. In Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI ’13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 193–200. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2460625.2460655
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Alex Butler, Shahram Izadi, and Steve Hodges. 2008. SideSight: Multi-”Touch” Interaction Around Small Devices. In Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’08). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 201–204. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1449715.1449746
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • Nicholas Chen, Francois Guimbretiere, and Abigail Sellen. 2012. Designing a Multi-slate Reading Environment to Support Active Reading Activities. ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum. Interact. 19, 3, Article 18 (Oct. 2012), 35 pages.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2362364.2362366
    Findings
  • 11. Xiang ’Anthony’ Chen, Tovi Grossman, Daniel J. Wigdor, and George Fitzmaurice. 2014. Duet: Exploring Joint Interactions on a Smart Phone and a Smart Watch. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 159–168. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2556288.2556955
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 12. Lung-Pan Cheng, Meng Han Lee, Che-Yang Wu, Fang-I Hsiao, et al. 20IrotateGrasp: Automatic Screen Rotation Based on Grasp of Mobile Devices. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 3051–3054. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2470654.2481424
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 13. Lee A Danisch, Kevin Englehart, and Andrew Trivett. 1999. Spatially continuous six-degrees-of-freedom position and orientation sensor. In Photonics East (ISAM, VVDC, IEMB). International Society for Optics and Photonics, 48–56.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • 14. Artem Dementyev, Jeremy Gummeson, Derek Thrasher, Aaron Parks, Deepak Ganesan, Joshua R. Smith, and Alanson P. Sample. 2013. Wirelessly Powered Bistable Display Tags. In Proceedings of the 2013 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. ACM, New York, NY, USA, 383–386. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2493432.2493516
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 15. David T. Gallant, Andrew G. Seniuk, and Roel Vertegaal. 2008. Towards More Paper-like Input: Flexible Input Devices for Foldable Interaction Styles. In Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’08). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 283–286. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1449715.1449762
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 16. Audrey Girouard, Aneesh Tarun, and Roel Vertegaal. 2012. DisplayStacks: Interaction Techniques for Stacks of Flexible Thin-film Displays. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2431–2440. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2207676.2208406
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 17. Mayank Goel, Jacob Wobbrock, and Shwetak Patel. 2012. GripSense: Using Built-in Sensors to Detect Hand Posture and Pressure on Commodity Mobile Phones. In Proceedings of the 25th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 545–554. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2380116.2380184
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 18. Antonio Gomes, Andrea Nesbitt, and Roel Vertegaal. 2013. MorePhone: A Study of Actuated Shape Deformations for Flexible Thin-film Smartphone Notifications. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’13). http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2470654.2470737
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 19. Antonio Gomes and Roel Vertegaal. 2015. PaperFold: Evaluating Shape Changes for Viewport Transformations in Foldable Thin-Film Display Devices. In Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI ’15). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 153–160. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2677199.2680572
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 20. Ken Hinckley, Morgan Dixon, Raman Sarin, Francois Guimbretiere, and Ravin Balakrishnan. 2009. Codex: A Dual Screen Tablet Computer. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’09). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1933–1942. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1518701.1518996
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 21. Ken Hinckley, Michel Pahud, Hrvoje Benko, Pourang Irani, et al. 2014. Sensing Techniques for Tablet+Stylus Interaction. In Proceedings of the 27th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 605–614. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2642918.2647379
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 22. David Holman, Roel Vertegaal, Mark Altosaar, Nikolaus Troje, and Derek Johns. 2005. Paper Windows: Interaction Techniques for Digital Paper. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’05). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 591–599. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1054972.1055054
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 23. Joanneum Research Forschungsgesellschaft mbH. 2016. http://www.joanneum.at/en/materials/researchareas/pyzoflexr.html. (2016).
    Findings
  • 24. Paul Kabbash, William Buxton, and Abigail Sellen. 1994. Two-handed Input in a Compound Task. In Conference Companion on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’94). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 230–. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/259963.260425
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 25. Mohammadreza Khalilbeigi, Roman Lissermann, Wolfgang Kleine, and Jurgen Steimle. 2012. FoldMe: Interacting with Double-sided Foldable Displays. In Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI ’12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 33–40. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2148131.2148142
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 26. Mohammadreza Khalilbeigi, Roman Lissermann, Max Muhlhauser, and Jurgen Steimle. 2011. Xpaaand: Interaction Techniques for Rollable Displays. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’11). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2729–2732. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1978942.1979344
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 27. Johan Kildal, Susanna Paasovaara, and Viljakaisa Aaltonen. 2012. Kinetic Device: Designing Interactions with a Deformable Mobile Interface. In CHI ’12 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1871–1876.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2212776.2223721
    Findings
  • 28. Byron Lahey, Audrey Girouard, Winslow Burleson, and Roel Vertegaal. 2011. PaperPhone: Understanding the Use of Bend Gestures in Mobile Devices with Flexible Electronic Paper Displays. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’11). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1303–1312. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1978942.1979136
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 29. Mathieu Le Goc, Stuart Taylor, Shahram Izadi, and Cem Keskin. 2014. A Low-cost Transparent Electric Field Sensor for 3D Interaction on Mobile Devices. In Proceedings of the 32Nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 3167–3170. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2556288.2557331
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 30. Johnny C. Lee, Scott E. Hudson, and Edward Tse. 2008. Foldable Interactive Displays. In Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’08). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 287–290. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1449715.1449763
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 31. Flora M. Li, Sandeep Unnikrishnan, Peter van de Weijer, Ferdie van Assche, et al. 2013. Flexible Barrier Technology for Enabling Rollable AMOLED Displays and Upscaling Flexible OLED Lighting. SID Symposium Digest of Technical Papers 44, 1 (2013), 199–202. http://stacks.iop.org/0268-1242/26/i=3/a=034001
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 32. Markus Lochtefeld, Christoph Hirtz, and Sven Gehring. 2013. Evaluation of Hybrid Front- and Back-of-device Interaction on Mobile Devices. In Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia (MUM ’13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, Article 17, 4 pages. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2541831.2541865
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 33. David C. McCallum, Edward Mak, Pourang Irani, and Sriram Subramanian. 2009. PressureText: Pressure Input for Mobile Phone Text Entry. In CHI ’09 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’09). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 4519–4524. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1520340.1520693
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 34. Ross McLachlan and Stephen Brewster. 2013. Can You Handle It?: Bimanual Techniques for Browsing Media Collections on Touchscreen Tablets. In CHI ’13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 3095–3098. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2468356.2479619
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 35. Oaxis Inc. 2015. http://www.inkcase.com. (2015).
    Findings
  • 36. Jin-Seong Park, Heeyeop Chae, Ho Kyoon Chung, and Sang In Lee. 2011. Thin film encapsulation for flexible AM-OLED: a review. Semiconductor Science and Technology 26, 3 (2011), 034001. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/j.2168-0159.2013.tb06178.x
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 37. Ken Perlin and David Fox. 1993. Pad: An Alternative Approach to the Computer Interface. In Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques (SIGGRAPH ’93). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 57–64. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/166117.166125
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 38. popSLATE Media, Inc. 2015. http://www.popslate.com. (2015).
    Findings
  • 39. Ali Rahimi and Benjamin Recht. 2007. Random features for large-scale kernel machines. In Advances in neural information processing systems. 1177–1184.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • 40. Christian Rendl, Patrick Greindl, Michael Haller, Martin Zirkl, et al. 2012. PyzoFlex: Printed Piezoelectric Pressure Sensing Foil. In Proceedings of the 25th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 509–518. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2380116.2380180
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 41. Christian Rendl, David Kim, Sean Fanello, Patrick Parzer, et al. 2014. FlexSense: A Transparent Self-sensing Deformable Surface. In Proceedings of the 27th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 129–138. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2642918.2647405
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 42. Carsten Schwesig, Ivan Poupyrev, and Eijiro Mori. 2004. Gummi: A Bendable Computer. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’04). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 263–270. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/985692.985726
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 43. Andrew Sears and Ben Shneiderman. 1991. High Precision Touchscreens: Design Strategies and Comparisons with a Mouse. Int. J. Man-Mach. Stud. 34, 4 (April 1991), 593–613. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0020-7373(91)90037-8
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 44. Katie A. Siek, Yvonne Rogers, and Kay H. Connelly. 2005. Fat Finger Worries: How Older and Younger Users Physically Interact with PDAs. In Human-Computer Interaction - INTERACT 2005, MariaFrancesca Costabile and Fabio Patern (Eds.). Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 3585. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 267–280. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/11555261_24
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 45. Hyunyoung Song, Hrvoje Benko, Francois Guimbretiere, Shahram Izadi, et al. 2011. Grips and Gestures on a Multi-touch Pen. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’11). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1323–1332. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1978942.1979138
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 46. Jie Song, Gabor Soros, Fabrizio Pece, Sean Ryan Fanello, et al. 2014. In-air Gestures Around Unmodified Mobile Devices. In Proceedings of the 27th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 319–329. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2642918.2647373
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 47. Jurgen Steimle, Andreas Jordt, and Pattie Maes. 2013. Flexpad: A Highly Flexible Handheld Display. In CHI ’13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2873–2874. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2468356.2479555
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 48. Taichi Tajika, Tomoko Yonezawa, and Noriaki Mitsunaga. 2008. Intuitive Page-turning Interface of e-Books on Flexible e-Paper Based on User Studies. In Proceedings of the 16th ACM International Conference on Multimedia (MM ’08). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 793–796. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1459359.1459489
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 49. Aneesh P. Tarun, Peng Wang, Audrey Girouard, Paul Strohmeier, et al. 2013. PaperTab: An Electronic Paper Computer with Multiple Large Flexible Electrophoretic Displays. In CHI ’13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’13). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 3131–3134. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2468356.2479628
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 50. Andrea Vedaldi and Andrew Zisserman. 2012. Efficient Additive Kernels via Explicit Feature Maps. IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence 34, 3 (March 2012), 480–492.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • 51. Nicolas Villar, Shahram Izadi, Dan Rosenfeld, Hrvoje Benko, et al. 2009. Mouse 2.0: Multi-touch Meets the Mouse. In Proceedings of the 22Nd Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’09). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 33–42. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1622176.1622184
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 52. Julie Wagner, Stephane Huot, and Wendy Mackay. 2012. BiTouch and BiPad: Designing Bimanual Interaction for Hand-held Tablets. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’12). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2317–2326. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2207676.2208391
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 53. Daniel Wigdor, Clifton Forlines, Patrick Baudisch, John Barnwell, and Chia Shen. 2007. Lucid Touch: A See-through Mobile Device. In Proceedings of the 20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST ’07). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 269–278. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1294211.1294259
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 54. Raphael Wimmer and Sebastian Boring. 2009. HandSense: Discriminating Different Ways of Grasping and Holding a Tangible User Interface. In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction (TEI ’09). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 359–362. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1517664.1517736
    Locate open access versionFindings
  • 55. Yota Devices. 2015. http://yotaphone.com. (2015).
    Findings
  • 56. Martin Zirkl, Anurak Sawatdee, Uta Helbig, Markus Krause, et al. 2011. An All-Printed Ferroelectric Active Matrix Sensor Network Based on Only Five Functional Materials Forming a Touchless Control Interface. Advanced Materials 23, 18 (2011), 2069–2074. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201100054
    Locate open access versionFindings
Your rating :
0

 

Best Paper
Best Paper of CHI, 2016
Tags
Comments