A Review of Relational Machine Learning for Knowledge Graphs

    Proceedings of the IEEE, Volume 104, Issue 1, 2015, Pages 11-33.

    Cited by: 494|Bibtex|Views122|Links
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    Keywords:
    Graph-based modelsknowledge extractionknowledge graphslatent feature modelsstatistical relational learning
    Wei bo:
    We demonstrated how statistical relational learning can be used in conjunction with machine reading and information extraction methods to automatically build such knowledge repositories

    Abstract:

    Relational machine learning studies methods for the statistical analysis of relational, or graph-structured, data. In this paper, we provide a review of how such statistical models can be “trained” on large knowledge graphs, and then used to predict new facts about the world (which is equivalent to predicting new edges in the graph). In p...More

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    Introduction
    • ‘‘The author is convinced that the crux of the problem of these graphs contain millions of nodes and billions of learning is recognizing relationships and being able edges.
    • This causes them to focus on scalable SRL techniques, to use them’’VChristopher Strachey in a letter to Alan which take time that is linear in the size of Turing, 1954.
    Highlights
    • YAGO [4], DBpedia [5], NELL [6], Freebase [7], and the Google Knowledge Graph [8]
    • Relational Learning Results: Path Ranking Algorithm has been shown to outperform the inductive logic programming method FOIL [106] for link prediction in NELL [116]
    • It has been shown to have comparable performance to ER-multilayer perceptrons on link prediction in knowledge vault: Path Ranking Algorithm obtained a result of 0.884 for the area under the ROC curve, as compared to 0.882 for ER-multilayer perceptrons [28]
    • We provided a review of state-of-the-art statistical relational learning (SRL) methods applied to very large knowledge graphs
    • We demonstrated how statistical relational learning can be used in conjunction with machine reading and information extraction methods to automatically build such knowledge repositories
    • These knowledge graphs are impressive in their size, they still fall short of representing many kinds of knowledge that humans possess
    Results
    • RESCAL has been shown to achieve state-of-the-art results on a number of relational learning tasks.
    • [63] showed that RESCAL provides comparable or better relationship prediction results on a number of small benchmark data sets compared to Markov logic networks [70], the infinite relational model [71], [72], and Bayesian clustered tensor factorization [73].
    • Latent feature models are well-suited for modeling global relational patterns via newly introduced latent variables
    • They are computationally efficient if triples can be explained with a small number of latent variables
    Conclusion
    • CONCLUDING REMARKS

      Knowledge graphs (KGs) have found important applications in question answering, structured search, exploratory search, and digital assistants.
    • The authors provided a review of state-of-the-art statistical relational learning (SRL) methods applied to very large knowledge graphs.
    • The authors showed how to create a truly massive, machine-interpretable ‘‘semantic memory’’ of facts, which is already empowering numerous practical applications.
    • These KGs are impressive in their size, they still fall short of representing many kinds of knowledge that humans possess.
    • Representing, learning, and reasoning with these kinds of knowledge remains the frontier for AI and machine learning. h
    Summary
    • YAGO [4], DBpedia [5], NELL [6], Freebase [7], and the Google Knowledge Graph [8]. As we discuss in Section II,

      ‘‘I am convinced that the crux of the problem of these graphs contain millions of nodes and billions of learning is recognizing relationships and being able edges.
    • We model each possible triple xijk 1⁄4 ðei; rk; ejÞ over this set of entities and relations as a binary random variable yijk 2 f0; 1g that indicates its existence.
    • We discuss how statistical relational learning can be applied to knowledge graphs.
    • A relational model for large-scale knowledge graphs should scale at most linearly with the data size, i.e., linearly in the number of entities
    • Once the parameters have been estimated, the computational complexity to predict the score of a triple depends only on the number of latent features and is independent of the size of the graph.
    • [63] showed that RESCAL provides comparable or better relationship prediction results on a number of small benchmark data sets compared to Markov logic networks [70], the infinite relational model [71], [72], and Bayesian clustered tensor factorization [73].
    • Jenatton et al [81] proposed a tensor factorization model for knowledge graphs with a very large number of different relations.
    • RESCAL represents pairs of entities ðei; ejÞ via the tensor product of their latent feature representations (5) and predicts the existence of the triple xijk from Fij via wk (4).
    • A. Similarity Measures for Unirelational Data Observable graph feature models are widely used for link prediction in graphs that consist only of a single relation, e.g., social network analysis, biology, and Web mining.
    • B. Rule Mining and Inductive Logic Programming Another class of models that works on the observed variables of a knowledge graph extracts rules via mining methods and uses these extracted rules to infer new links.
    • A good example is the marriedTo relation: One marriage corresponds to a single strongly connected component, so data with a large number of marriages would be difficult to model with RLFMs. predicting marriedTo links via graph-based models is easy: the existence of the triple (John, marriedTo, Mary) can be predicted from the existence of (Mary, marriedTo, John), by exploiting the symmetry of the relation.
    • An alternative approach to generate negative examples is to exploit known constraints on the structure of a knowledge graph: Type constraints for predicates, valid value ranges for attributes, or functional constraints such as mutual exclusion can all be used for this purpose.
    • A common approach is to use Markov logic [126], which is a template language based on logical formulae: Given a set of formulae F 1⁄4 fFigLi1⁄41, we create an edge between nodes in the dependency graph if the corresponding facts occur in at least one grounded formula.
    • Representing, learning, and reasoning with these kinds of knowledge remains the frontier for AI and machine learning. h
    Tables
    • Table1: Knowledge Base Construction Projects
    • Table2: Size of Some Schema-Based Knowledge Bases
    • Table3: Summary of the Notation
    • Table4: Semantic Embeddings of KV-MLP on Freebase
    • Table5: Summary of the Latent Feature Models. ha, hb, and hc Are Hidden Layers of the Neural Network; See Text for Details
    • Table6: Examples of Paths Learned by PRA on Freebase to Predict Which College a Person Attended
    Download tables as Excel
    Funding
    • Nickel was supported by the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines (CBMM) under NSF STC award CCF-1231216
    • Tresp was supported by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy under the ‘‘Smart Data’’ technology program (Grant 01MT14001)
    Study subjects and analysis
    male: 10306
    In Section VII, we will furthermore discuss aspects of how to train these models on knowledge graphs. 8As an example, there are currently 10306 male and 7586 female American actors listed in Wikipedia, while there are only 1268 male and 1354 female Indian, and 77 male and no female Nigerian actors. India and Nigeria, however, are the largest and second largest film industries in the world

    adults: 3
    To explain this further, consider a KG involving two types of entities, adults and children, and two types of relations, parentOf and marriedTo. Fig. 6(a) depicts a sample KG with three adults and one child. Obviously, these relations (edges) are correlated, since people who share a common child are often married, while people rarely marry their own children

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