Patina Engraver: Visualizing Activity Logs as Patina in Fashionable Trackers

CHI, pp. 1173-1182, 2015.

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Keywords:
fashionactivity trackermiscellaneousdigital fabricationpatina
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With the deployment of the Patina Engraving System through an “in the wild” study, we explored how participants’ activity tracking experience could be affected through patina engraving

Abstract:

Despite technological improvements in commercial activity trackers, little attention has been given to their emotional, social, or fashion-related qualities, such as their visual aesthetics and their relationship to self-expression and social connection. As an alternative integrated approach incorporating HCI, fashion, and product design,...More

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Introduction
  • There has been a proliferation of commercial activity trackers for monitoring physical activity related to health and wellbeing, including Jawbone UP, Fitbit, Misfit Wearables, and others [23].
  • The previous work in this domain contributed to the understanding of the practices of tracking systems
  • It emphasized the necessity of producing more than technological improvements in activity tracking, the importance of considering the emotional aspects of tracking, and the notion of developing social tracking beyond the ability to publish data to social networks [30].
  • This study takes a design approach to activity trackers as a fashionable item and attempts to improve their emotional and social qualities
Highlights
  • Recently, there has been a proliferation of commercial activity trackers for monitoring physical activity related to health and wellbeing, including Jawbone UP, Fitbit, Misfit Wearables, and others [23]
  • One of the important aspects of activity trackers is that they are personal fashion items that play a role in personal identity, visual aesthetics, and social communication that goes beyond technological features such as usability and sensing accuracy etc. [2, 28, 32]
  • We present the Patina Engraving System (Patina Engraver and Patina Tracker), which engraves patina-like patterns on the wristband of activity trackers and thereby visualizes users’ accumulated activity logs
  • PATINA ENGRAVING SYSTEM Through the exploration of a piercing technique and material and visual patterns, we developed a prototype of the Patina Engraving System consisting of the Patina Tracker and the Patina Engraver
  • In this paper, we have presented a new design approach for activity trackers by visualizing activity logs in the form of patina
  • With the deployment of the Patina Engraving System through an “in the wild” study, we explored how participants’ activity tracking experience could be affected through patina engraving
Methods
  • The Patina Engraver and Trackers were used for 5 weeks.
  • To lessen the participants’ burden and observe how the system pervaded their normal lives, the Patina Engraver was installed in a building which all participants could reach within 10 minutes by foot; it was close to the gym where the participants play badminton.
  • Participants were asked to set up their trackers and applications.
  • Participants were allowed to sync their logs as desired using a personal computer or mobile phone
Results
  • Participants were receptive to the idea of engraving patina and were engaged with using their Patina Trackers and Engraver.
  • The activity logs varied depending on each participant’s tracking style.
  • In general, participant’s average amount of steps, active time, active calories, and time in bed tended to decrease after the 1st week as the tracking system became ordinary to them.
  • We confirmed that participants become familiar with activity trackers: “Though it was interesting to monitor my data at first, I got used to it after using the tracker several times.
  • The author is monitoring it less frequently than the 1st week” (M3, week 2)
Conclusion
  • Design Implications for Fashionable Trackers Using Patina All fashionable items have physical, psychological, and social functions [2].
  • The authors discuss research and design implications to improve the use of patina for making fashionable activity trackers.
  • If users are able to set the scope of the activity log— specific days, time slots per day, etc.—and the system utilized these to engrave patina, the tracker with patina patterns may be able to show more personal stories about their lives and deliver more useful information.The authors' motivation for conducting this study was to make fashionable activity trackers that generate an engaging experience.
  • The authors expect this research to inspire designs for diverse tracking devices and services, as well as general fashion and product designs
Summary
  • Introduction:

    There has been a proliferation of commercial activity trackers for monitoring physical activity related to health and wellbeing, including Jawbone UP, Fitbit, Misfit Wearables, and others [23].
  • The previous work in this domain contributed to the understanding of the practices of tracking systems
  • It emphasized the necessity of producing more than technological improvements in activity tracking, the importance of considering the emotional aspects of tracking, and the notion of developing social tracking beyond the ability to publish data to social networks [30].
  • This study takes a design approach to activity trackers as a fashionable item and attempts to improve their emotional and social qualities
  • Methods:

    The Patina Engraver and Trackers were used for 5 weeks.
  • To lessen the participants’ burden and observe how the system pervaded their normal lives, the Patina Engraver was installed in a building which all participants could reach within 10 minutes by foot; it was close to the gym where the participants play badminton.
  • Participants were asked to set up their trackers and applications.
  • Participants were allowed to sync their logs as desired using a personal computer or mobile phone
  • Results:

    Participants were receptive to the idea of engraving patina and were engaged with using their Patina Trackers and Engraver.
  • The activity logs varied depending on each participant’s tracking style.
  • In general, participant’s average amount of steps, active time, active calories, and time in bed tended to decrease after the 1st week as the tracking system became ordinary to them.
  • We confirmed that participants become familiar with activity trackers: “Though it was interesting to monitor my data at first, I got used to it after using the tracker several times.
  • The author is monitoring it less frequently than the 1st week” (M3, week 2)
  • Conclusion:

    Design Implications for Fashionable Trackers Using Patina All fashionable items have physical, psychological, and social functions [2].
  • The authors discuss research and design implications to improve the use of patina for making fashionable activity trackers.
  • If users are able to set the scope of the activity log— specific days, time slots per day, etc.—and the system utilized these to engrave patina, the tracker with patina patterns may be able to show more personal stories about their lives and deliver more useful information.The authors' motivation for conducting this study was to make fashionable activity trackers that generate an engaging experience.
  • The authors expect this research to inspire designs for diverse tracking devices and services, as well as general fashion and product designs
Tables
  • Table1: Average activity logs during 5 weeks
Download tables as Excel
Funding
  • This research was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (NRF-2014S1A5A2A01010939) and IT R&D program of MSIP/KEIT (2014, 10041313, UX-oriented Mobile SW Platform)
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