Multiview: improving trust in group video conferencing through spatial faithfulness

CHI, pp. 1465-1474, 2007.

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Keywords:
spatially faithful videotrust formation patterngroup videononverbal cuespatial distortionMore(14+)
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We introduced the design of a new video conferencing system which preserves many of the nonverbal cues lost in standard video conferencing systems by being spatially faithful

Abstract:

Video conferencing is still considered a poor alternative to face-to-face meetings. In the business setting, where these systems are most prevalent, the misuse of video conferencing systems can have detrimental results, especially in high-stakes communications. Prior work suggests that spatial distortions of nonverbal cues, particularly g...More

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Introduction
  • The goal of any computer-mediated communication system is to enable people to effectively accomplish the task at hand.
  • Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page.
  • The authors consider the effect of video conferencing systems on trust formation
Highlights
  • The goal of any computer-mediated communication system is to enable people to effectively accomplish the task at hand
  • We expect that the total cooperative investment by groups meeting face-to-face will be significantly higher than the total cooperative investment by groups meeting through non-directional video conferencing
  • It showed that cooperative investment by groups meeting through directional video conferencing was significantly higher than by groups meeting through non-directional video conferencing, F (1, 20) = 4.42, p <
  • Our results show that groups meeting face-to-face tended to be more resilient to breakdowns in trust when compared to groups that met through non-directional video conferencing
  • We introduced the design of a new video conferencing system which preserves many of the nonverbal cues lost in standard video conferencing systems by being spatially faithful
  • The group-to-group configurations in our study cooperatively invested less and trust was more fragile when meeting through non-directional video conferencing than when meeting face-to-face
Methods
  • Participants Participants were recruited by the Experimental Social Science Laboratory (XLab) at University of California, Berkeley.
  • The XLab maintains a database of university affiliated students and staff members who are interested in taking part in experiments.
  • The average age of student participants was 20 years old, and the average age of staff member participants was 39.
  • These participants formed 29 groups of 2 and 37 groups of 3.
  • Groups played against each other in three different conditions in a between-group study
Results
  • RESULTS AND ANALYSIS

    Overall Cooperative Investment The authors begin by looking at overall trust which is measured by the total cooperative investment across the entire game.
  • The analysis showed cooperative investment by groups meeting face-to-face was significantly higher than by groups meeting through non-directional video conferencing, F (1, 20) = 5.21, p < .05.
  • It showed that cooperative investment by groups meeting through directional video conferencing was significantly higher than by groups meeting through non-directional video conferencing, F (1, 20) = 4.42, p < .05.
  • No significant difference in cooperative investment was found between groups meeting face-to-face and groups meeting through directional video conferencing, F (1, 20) = .01, p = .92
Conclusion
  • On the basis of the above findings, the authors will revisit the hypotheses set out earlier.

    For this experiment, the authors used a variant of Daytrader as the measure of trust.
  • The results from the trust inventory show a positive and significant correlation between investment amounts and trust scores adding internal validity to Daytrader as a trust measurement device.
  • This hypothesis is supported on the basis of the descriptive statistics.
  • The group-to-group configurations in the study cooperatively invested less and trust was more fragile when meeting through non-directional video conferencing than when meeting face-to-face.
  • For all the measures of trust, there was no measurable difference in cooperative behavior between groups meeting face-to-face and groups meeting through MultiView
Summary
  • Introduction:

    The goal of any computer-mediated communication system is to enable people to effectively accomplish the task at hand.
  • Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page.
  • The authors consider the effect of video conferencing systems on trust formation
  • Objectives:

    The authors aim to understand how video conferencing systems affect various aspects of group-to-group communication to inform both appropriate use of video conferencing and design of future systems.
  • Methods:

    Participants Participants were recruited by the Experimental Social Science Laboratory (XLab) at University of California, Berkeley.
  • The XLab maintains a database of university affiliated students and staff members who are interested in taking part in experiments.
  • The average age of student participants was 20 years old, and the average age of staff member participants was 39.
  • These participants formed 29 groups of 2 and 37 groups of 3.
  • Groups played against each other in three different conditions in a between-group study
  • Results:

    RESULTS AND ANALYSIS

    Overall Cooperative Investment The authors begin by looking at overall trust which is measured by the total cooperative investment across the entire game.
  • The analysis showed cooperative investment by groups meeting face-to-face was significantly higher than by groups meeting through non-directional video conferencing, F (1, 20) = 5.21, p < .05.
  • It showed that cooperative investment by groups meeting through directional video conferencing was significantly higher than by groups meeting through non-directional video conferencing, F (1, 20) = 4.42, p < .05.
  • No significant difference in cooperative investment was found between groups meeting face-to-face and groups meeting through directional video conferencing, F (1, 20) = .01, p = .92
  • Conclusion:

    On the basis of the above findings, the authors will revisit the hypotheses set out earlier.

    For this experiment, the authors used a variant of Daytrader as the measure of trust.
  • The results from the trust inventory show a positive and significant correlation between investment amounts and trust scores adding internal validity to Daytrader as a trust measurement device.
  • This hypothesis is supported on the basis of the descriptive statistics.
  • The group-to-group configurations in the study cooperatively invested less and trust was more fragile when meeting through non-directional video conferencing than when meeting face-to-face.
  • For all the measures of trust, there was no measurable difference in cooperative behavior between groups meeting face-to-face and groups meeting through MultiView
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