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Our IP router demonstrates that real routers can be built by connecting small, modular elements, and our performance analysis shows that this need not come at unacceptable cost—the Click IP router is just 10% slower than Linux 2.2.10, our base system

The Click modular router

ACM Transactions on Computer Systems, no. 3 (2000): 263-297

Cited by: 540|Views188
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Abstract

Click is a new software architecture for building flexible and configurable routers. A Click router is assembled from packet processing modules called elements. Individual elements implement simple router functions like packet classification, queueing, scheduling, and interfacing with network devices. Complete configurations are built by ...More

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Introduction
  • Routers are increasingly expected to do more than route packets.
  • Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage, and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page.
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Highlights
  • Routers are increasingly expected to do more than route packets
  • This paper presents Click, a flexible, modular software architecture for building routers
  • We present an element in Section 4.2 that, using these features, implements four variants of the random early detection dropping policy (RED) [11]—RED, RED over multiple queues, weighted RED, and drop-fromfront RED—depending on its context in the router
  • Our IP router demonstrates that real routers can be built by connecting small, modular elements, and our performance analysis shows that this need not come at unacceptable cost—the Click IP router is just 10% slower than Linux 2.2.10, our base system
  • Interesting scheduling and dropping policies, complex queueing, and Differential Services can be added to the IP router by adding a couple of elements, and Click is flexible enough to support other applications as well
Methods
  • The experimental setup consists of three Intel PCs running Linux 2.2.10: a source host, the router being tested, and a destination host.
  • The router has two 100 Mbit Ethernet cards connected, by point-to-point links, to the source and destination hosts.
  • The router hardware is a 450 MHz Intel Pentium III CPU, an Intel 440BX PCI chip set, 256 megabytes of SDRAM, and two DEC 21140 100 Mbit PCI Ethernet controllers.
  • The source host has a 300 MHz Pentium II CPU and a DEC 21140 Ethernet controller.
  • The source-torouter and router-to-destination links are point-to-point full-duplex 100 Mbit Ethernet
Results
  • Click’s performance goals are to forward packets quickly enough to keep typical access links busy, to impose a low cost for incremental additions to configurations, and to correctly implement complex behaviors like packet scheduling.
Conclusion
  • Extensible, and configurable router framework.
  • The authors' IP router demonstrates that real routers can be built by connecting small, modular elements, and the performance analysis shows that this need not come at unacceptable cost—the Click IP router is just 10% slower than Linux 2.2.10, the base system.
  • Interesting scheduling and dropping policies, complex queueing, and Differential Services can be added to the IP router by adding a couple of elements, and Click is flexible enough to support other applications as well.
  • The authors have made the Click system free software; it is available for download at http://www.pdos.lcs.mit.edu/ click/
Tables
  • Table1: Average CPU time cost for basic IP forwarding in microseconds per packet
  • Table2: Microbenchmarks of individual elements involved in IP forwarding, measured in nanoseconds per packet
Download tables as Excel
Related work
  • Several previous projects have investigated composable network software. These projects concentrated on end nodes, where packet motion is vertical (between the network and user level) rather than horizontal (between interfaces), so they aren’t as well suited as Click for routing. None of them have pull processing, explicit queues, or flow-based router context.

    The x-kernel [12] is a framework for implementing and composing network protocols. Like a Click router, an x-kernel configuration is a graph of processing nodes, and packets are passed between nodes through virtual function calls. Unlike Click, an x-kernel configuration graph is always acyclic and layered, as x-kernel nodes were intended to represent protocols in a protocol stack. This prevents cyclic configurations like the IP router (Figure 8). Connections between nodes are bidirectional— packets travel up the graph to user level and down the graph to the network. Packets pass alternately through “protocol” nodes and “session” nodes, where the session nodes correspond to end-to-end network connections like TCP sessions; session nodes are irrelevant to most routers. The inter-node communication protocols are more complex than Click’s. Lastly, many protocol graph changes require recompilation.
Funding
  • This research was supported by a National Science Foundation (NSF) Young Investigator Award and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Rome Laboratory under agreement number F30602-97-2-0288
  • In addition, Eddie Kohler was supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship
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